Common bash commands

typing this (if you're on a Mac)or this (if you run Windows)does this
cd /
cd /
takes you to the root directory
cd ~
no direct shortcut
takes you to your home directory
cd ..
cd ..
takes you up one level in your file directory
cd ../../
cd ../../
takes you up two levels in your file directory
cd path/to/some/folder
cd path/to/some/folder
take you to some folder on your computer
tar -xvzf [fileName.tar.gz]
tar -xvzf [fileName.tar.gz]
unzip a .tar file
gzip [filename]
gzip [filename]
Compresses a file to be filename.gz
ls and ls -l and ls -a
ls and ls -l and ls -a or dir
list all files and folders in your working diretory with info on permissions. -a option shows hidden files
ls -l | wc -l
ls -l | wc -l
counts files in a directory
mv [fileName or folderName] [directory]
mv [fileName or folderName] [directory]
Moves a file or folder to a new location. Important, if the new location doesn't exist then mv renames your file to the destination name
du -a -h | sort -hr
no direct shortcut
lists all files and folders in your working directory sorted by size
du -sh *
du -sh *
simpler version of the command above. lists all files in a folder and shows their file size
df -h
df -h
view free/used disk space by drive
tree -d
tree -d
lists all files and folders in your working directory as a tree structure
lsblk
no direct shortcut
lists drives and their size (as well as used/free space on each)
pressing up arrow
pressing up arrow
recalls previous command
chmod ### [fileName]
chmod ### [fileName]
edits permissions on file. See graphic below for the appropriate numbers to use in place of ###
chown [yourUserName] [fileName]
chown [yourUserName] [fileName]
makes you the owner of a file
chgrp [yourUserName] [fileName]
chgrp [yourUserName] [fileName]
assigns you as the group for the file
rm -rf [directoryName]
rm -rf [directoryName]
removes a folder and all of its contents
wget [URLtoFile]
no direct shortcut
downloads a file from the web
nano [file.txt]
nano [file.txt]
opens up a text file in a text editor directly in your Bash application
export PATH="/path/to/your/software/:$PATH"
no direct shortcut
add a new piece of software to the system PATH so it is executable from anywhere
alias something="something else"
doskey something=something else
add lines like this to your ~/.bash_profile to create a keyboard shortcut, in this case typing 'something' actually does 'something else'